Old fire alarms don't save lives, fire chief

Old fire alarms don't save lives, fire chief - Dryden firefighters are rolling up their sleeves. They've gone through the results of their recent door-to-door survey, and they're realizing there's lots of work to be done.

Kurtz"Anybody, I'd say with a home more than 10 years old right now probably assumes their smoke alarm is in working condition, whereas after 10 years they've reached their lifespan for operability," says fire chief Ken Kurz.

Results of the survey showed only one in five had a working smoke detector.

"I mean it's alarming only 20 per cent on average did not have a smoke alarm. That's a real concern for life safety. Then, a lot of people just think there smoke alarm is there and it'll last forever. It will not," Kurz continued.

The survey was conducted in partnership with the national fire marshall's office. They purposely focused on some of the older areas of town, in order to check their theory.

"Well, it's definitely a time-consuming project, but it's definitely worthwhile," he said. "Again, we have 3,500 residential units starting with the oldest ones. Not even getting through 100 of them shows this could be quite a long-term project."

Dryden has been chosen as one of five communities in Ontario to be part of a nation-wide study on the use of the alarms. Thanks to a donation from Gillon's Insurance, the fire service has a hundred alarms to hand out to those in need. Otherwise, the fine is $235.

In 1970, families had 17 minutes to escape a fire in their home. In 2005, it was just three minutes.

"Smoke alarms save lives. So, make sure yours is working today," the chief concluded.

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Dryden firefighters are rolling up their sleeves. They've gone through the results of their recent door-to-door survey, and they're realizing there's lots of work to be done.

"Anybody, I'd say with a home more than 10 years old right now probably assumes their smoke alarm is in working condition, whereas after 10 years they've reached their lifespan for operability," says fire chief Ken Kurz.

Results of the survey showed only one in five had a working smoke detector.

"I mean it's alarming only 20 per cent on average did not have a smoke alarm. That's a real concern for life safety. Then, a lot of people just think there smoke alarm is there and it'll last forever. It will not," Kurz continued.

The survey was conducted in partnership with the national fire marshall's office. They purposely focused on some of the older areas of town, in order to check their theory.

"Well, it's definitely a time-consuming project, but it's definitely worthwhile," he said. "Again, we have 3,500 residential units starting with the oldest ones. Not even getting through 100 of them shows this could be quite a long-term project."

Dryden has been chosen as one of five communities in Ontario to be part of a nation-wide study on the use of the alarms. Thanks to a donation from Gillon's Insurance, the fire service has a hundred alarms to hand out to those in need. Otherwise, the fine is $235.

In 1970, families had 17 minutes to escape a fire in their home. In 2005, it was just three minutes.

"Smoke alarms save lives. So, make sure yours is working today," the chief concluded. - See more at: http://www.kenoraonline.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=65... firefighters are rolling up their sleeves. They've gone through the results of their recent door-to-door survey, and they're realizing there's lots of work to be done.

"Anybody, I'd say with a home more than 10 years old right now probably assumes their smoke alarm is in working condition, whereas after 10 years they've reached their lifespan for operability," says fire chief Ken Kurz.

Results of the survey showed only one in five had a working smoke detector.

"I mean it's alarming only 20 per cent on average did not have a smoke alarm. That's a real concern for life safety. Then, a lot of people just think there smoke alarm is there and it'll last forever. It will not," Kurz continued.

The survey was conducted in partnership with the national fire marshall's office. They purposely focused on some of the older areas of town, in order to check their theory.

"Well, it's definitely a time-consuming project, but it's definitely worthwhile," he said. "Again, we have 3,500 residential units starting with the oldest ones. Not even getting through 100 of them shows this could be quite a long-term project."

Dryden has been chosen as one of five communities in Ontario to be part of a nation-wide study on the use of the alarms. Thanks to a donation from Gillon's Insurance, the fire service has a hundred alarms to hand out to those in need. Otherwise, the fine is $235.

In 1970, families had 17 minutes to escape a fire in their home. In 2005, it was just three minutes.

"Smoke alarms save lives. So, make sure yours is working today," the chief concluded. - See more at: http://www.kenoraonline.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=6511&Itemid=160#sthash.AC0eaciK.dpuf
Dryden firefighters are rolling up their sleeves. They've gone through the results of their recent door-to-door survey, and they're realizing there's lots of work to be done.

"Anybody, I'd say with a home more than 10 years old right now probably assumes their smoke alarm is in working condition, whereas after 10 years they've reached their lifespan for operability," says fire chief Ken Kurz.

Results of the survey showed only one in five had a working smoke detector.

"I mean it's alarming only 20 per cent on average did not have a smoke alarm. That's a real concern for life safety. Then, a lot of people just think there smoke alarm is there and it'll last forever. It will not," Kurz continued.

The survey was conducted in partnership with the national fire marshall's office. They purposely focused on some of the older areas of town, in order to check their theory.

"Well, it's definitely a time-consuming project, but it's definitely worthwhile," he said. "Again, we have 3,500 residential units starting with the oldest ones. Not even getting through 100 of them shows this could be quite a long-term project."

Dryden has been chosen as one of five communities in Ontario to be part of a nation-wide study on the use of the alarms. Thanks to a donation from Gillon's Insurance, the fire service has a hundred alarms to hand out to those in need. Otherwise, the fine is $235.

In 1970, families had 17 minutes to escape a fire in their home. In 2005, it was just three minutes.

"Smoke alarms save lives. So, make sure yours is working today," the chief concluded. - See more at: http://www.kenoraonline.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=6511&Itemid=160#sthash.AC0eaciK.dpuf
Dryden firefighters are rolling up their sleeves. They've gone through the results of their recent door-to-door survey, and they're realizing there's lots of work to be done.

"Anybody, I'd say with a home more than 10 years old right now probably assumes their smoke alarm is in working condition, whereas after 10 years they've reached their lifespan for operability," says fire chief Ken Kurz.

Results of the survey showed only one in five had a working smoke detector.

"I mean it's alarming only 20 per cent on average did not have a smoke alarm. That's a real concern for life safety. Then, a lot of people just think there smoke alarm is there and it'll last forever. It will not," Kurz continued.

The survey was conducted in partnership with the national fire marshall's office. They purposely focused on some of the older areas of town, in order to check their theory.

"Well, it's definitely a time-consuming project, but it's definitely worthwhile," he said. "Again, we have 3,500 residential units starting with the oldest ones. Not even getting through 100 of them shows this could be quite a long-term project."

Dryden has been chosen as one of five communities in Ontario to be part of a nation-wide study on the use of the alarms. Thanks to a donation from Gillon's Insurance, the fire service has a hundred alarms to hand out to those in need. Otherwise, the fine is $235.

In 1970, families had 17 minutes to escape a fire in their home. In 2005, it was just three minutes.

"Smoke alarms save lives. So, make sure yours is working today," the chief concluded. - See more at: http://www.kenoraonline.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=6511&Itemid=160#sthash.AC0eaciK.dpuf
Dryden firefighters are rolling up their sleeves. They've gone through the results of their recent door-to-door survey, and they're realizing there's lots of work to be done.

"Anybody, I'd say with a home more than 10 years old right now probably assumes their smoke alarm is in working condition, whereas after 10 years they've reached their lifespan for operability," says fire chief Ken Kurz.

Results of the survey showed only one in five had a working smoke detector.

"I mean it's alarming only 20 per cent on average did not have a smoke alarm. That's a real concern for life safety. Then, a lot of people just think there smoke alarm is there and it'll last forever. It will not," Kurz continued.

The survey was conducted in partnership with the national fire marshall's office. They purposely focused on some of the older areas of town, in order to check their theory.

"Well, it's definitely a time-consuming project, but it's definitely worthwhile," he said. "Again, we have 3,500 residential units starting with the oldest ones. Not even getting through 100 of them shows this could be quite a long-term project."

Dryden has been chosen as one of five communities in Ontario to be part of a nation-wide study on the use of the alarms. Thanks to a donation from Gillon's Insurance, the fire service has a hundred alarms to hand out to those in need. Otherwise, the fine is $235.

In 1970, families had 17 minutes to escape a fire in their home. In 2005, it was just three minutes.

"Smoke alarms save lives. So, make sure yours is working today," the chief concluded. - See more at: http://www.kenoraonline.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=6511&Itemid=160#sthash.AC0eaciK.dpuf
Dryden firefighters are rolling up their sleeves. They've gone through the results of their recent door-to-door survey, and they're realizing there's lots of work to be done.

"Anybody, I'd say with a home more than 10 years old right now probably assumes their smoke alarm is in working condition, whereas after 10 years they've reached their lifespan for operability," says fire chief Ken Kurz.

Results of the survey showed only one in five had a working smoke detector.

"I mean it's alarming only 20 per cent on average did not have a smoke alarm. That's a real concern for life safety. Then, a lot of people just think there smoke alarm is there and it'll last forever. It will not," Kurz continued.

The survey was conducted in partnership with the national fire marshall's office. They purposely focused on some of the older areas of town, in order to check their theory.

"Well, it's definitely a time-consuming project, but it's definitely worthwhile," he said. "Again, we have 3,500 residential units starting with the oldest ones. Not even getting through 100 of them shows this could be quite a long-term project."

Dryden has been chosen as one of five communities in Ontario to be part of a nation-wide study on the use of the alarms. Thanks to a donation from Gillon's Insurance, the fire service has a hundred alarms to hand out to those in need. Otherwise, the fine is $235.

In 1970, families had 17 minutes to escape a fire in their home. In 2005, it was just three minutes.

"Smoke alarms save lives. So, make sure yours is working today," the chief concluded. - See more at: http://www.kenoraonline.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=6511&Itemid=160#sthash.AC0eaciK.dpuf
Dryden Fire alarmsDryden firefighter Reagan Breeze shows a broken smoke alarm.

Dryden firefighters are rolling up their sleeves. They've gone through the results of their recent door-to-door survey, and they're realizing there's lots of work to be done.

"Anybody, I'd say with a home more than 10 years old right now probably assumes their smoke alarm is in working condition, whereas after 10 years they've reached their lifespan for operability," says fire chief Ken Kurz.

Results of the survey showed only one in five had a working smoke detector.

"I mean it's alarming only 20 per cent on average did not have a smoke alarm. That's a real concern for life safety. Then, a lot of people just think there smoke alarm is there and it'll last forever. It will not," Kurz continued.

The survey was conducted in partnership with the national fire marshall's office. They purposely focused on some of the older areas of town, in order to check their theory.

"Well, it's definitely a time-consuming project, but it's definitely worthwhile," he said. "Again, we have 3,500 residential units starting with the oldest ones. Not even getting through 100 of them shows this could be quite a long-term project."

Dryden has been chosen as one of five communities in Ontario to be part of a nation-wide study on the use of the alarms. Thanks to a donation from Gillon's Insurance, the fire service has a hundred alarms to hand out to those in need. Otherwise, the fine is $235.

In 1970, families had 17 minutes to escape a fire in their home. In 2005, it was just three minutes.

"Smoke alarms save lives. So, make sure yours is working today," the chief concluded.

KurtzFire chief Ken Kurz addresses Dryden council about future plans for the department. - See more at: http://www.kenoraonline.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=6511&Itemid=160#sthash.AC0eaciK.dpuf
Dryden Fire alarmsDryden firefighter Reagan Breeze shows a broken smoke alarm.

Dryden firefighters are rolling up their sleeves. They've gone through the results of their recent door-to-door survey, and they're realizing there's lots of work to be done.

"Anybody, I'd say with a home more than 10 years old right now probably assumes their smoke alarm is in working condition, whereas after 10 years they've reached their lifespan for operability," says fire chief Ken Kurz.

Results of the survey showed only one in five had a working smoke detector.

"I mean it's alarming only 20 per cent on average did not have a smoke alarm. That's a real concern for life safety. Then, a lot of people just think there smoke alarm is there and it'll last forever. It will not," Kurz continued.

The survey was conducted in partnership with the national fire marshall's office. They purposely focused on some of the older areas of town, in order to check their theory.

"Well, it's definitely a time-consuming project, but it's definitely worthwhile," he said. "Again, we have 3,500 residential units starting with the oldest ones. Not even getting through 100 of them shows this could be quite a long-term project."

Dryden has been chosen as one of five communities in Ontario to be part of a nation-wide study on the use of the alarms. Thanks to a donation from Gillon's Insurance, the fire service has a hundred alarms to hand out to those in need. Otherwise, the fine is $235.

In 1970, families had 17 minutes to escape a fire in their home. In 2005, it was just three minutes.

"Smoke alarms save lives. So, make sure yours is working today," the chief concluded.

KurtzFire chief Ken Kurz addresses Dryden council about future plans for the department. - See more at: http://www.kenoraonline.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=6511&Itemid=160#sthash.AC0eaciK.dpuf
Dryden Fire alarmsDryden firefighter Reagan Breeze shows a broken smoke alarm.

Dryden firefighters are rolling up their sleeves. They've gone through the results of their recent door-to-door survey, and they're realizing there's lots of work to be done.

"Anybody, I'd say with a home more than 10 years old right now probably assumes their smoke alarm is in working condition, whereas after 10 years they've reached their lifespan for operability," says fire chief Ken Kurz.

Results of the survey showed only one in five had a working smoke detector.

"I mean it's alarming only 20 per cent on average did not have a smoke alarm. That's a real concern for life safety. Then, a lot of people just think there smoke alarm is there and it'll last forever. It will not," Kurz continued.

The survey was conducted in partnership with the national fire marshall's office. They purposely focused on some of the older areas of town, in order to check their theory.

"Well, it's definitely a time-consuming project, but it's definitely worthwhile," he said. "Again, we have 3,500 residential units starting with the oldest ones. Not even getting through 100 of them shows this could be quite a long-term project."

Dryden has been chosen as one of five communities in Ontario to be part of a nation-wide study on the use of the alarms. Thanks to a donation from Gillon's Insurance, the fire service has a hundred alarms to hand out to those in need. Otherwise, the fine is $235.

In 1970, families had 17 minutes to escape a fire in their home. In 2005, it was just three minutes.

"Smoke alarms save lives. So, make sure yours is working today," the chief concluded.

KurtzFire chief Ken Kurz addresses Dryden council about future plans for the department. - See more at: http://www.kenoraonline.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=6511&Itemid=160#sthash.AC0eaciK.dpuf